Day 28 of Lent, April 1, 2020

Today’s Morning Prayer is available on our St. Paul Cape Ann Facebook page. Bible Study is schedule for noon today. Please write to us at office@stpaulcapeann.org or to Pastor Anne at pastor@stpaulcapeann.org if you would like the link to join the bible study. We are reading Isaiah, and will start today with chapter 62. If you would like to explore more of Isaiah, please go to Enter the Bible, a website of wonderful research, commentary and study help published by Luther Seminary. You can find that link here.

Zoom Bible Study

Dear all, if you want to join our on-line Zoom bible study on Wednesdays at noon, the link is below. We are reading the book of Isaiah and are currently in chapter 59.

Topic: Zoom Bible Study!
Time: This is a recurring meeting Meet anytime

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Covid-19 Updates and reflections

Greetings all,

This week in my telephone calls, virtual conversations and emails, I’m hearing many feelings arise as we realize the extent of the pandemic and the length of time we may be practicing social distance and self-isolation. This has put us in a new place as church, but we are still church. Since I cannot visit people, or see you in worship, or in other activities, I am relying on a different kind of presence in a new way. That is the presence of prayer. It is prayer as the practice of the presence of God, as Brother Lawrence put it centuries ago. This is not a new discipline, but it is coming into high relief as a way of staying close to everyone. I may not be able to be present physically, but I am staying present to you in prayer, and relying on the presence of God with us in all that we are experiencing right now. I encourage you to reach out to each other in whatever ways you have available, whether telephone, or email, or social media. In February, before we were experiencing the pandemic, I had thought of leaving Facebook altogether. I’m so glad I didn’t, and so glad we’ve been able to have church services that way.

Thanks to the tech team at St. Paul, Howard Blazzard, Joel Maxwell and Anne Wheeler, we’ve been able to livestream worship on Facebook on Sunday, as well as Microsoft Teams–a virtual platform that allows us to listen and interact. Anne Wheeler is sending those links each week before worship and in the FYI. We are using Facebook Live for Morning Prayer on Wednesdays. Bible Study has gone to a virtual Zoom platform so that we can interact. If you want to worship with us, just sign-up on this webpage for the weekly St. Paul FYI. If you want to join bible study, you can find the link below, or write to me at pastor@stpaulcapeann.org. You can write or call us at anytime. Anne Wheeler is monitoring all the office mails and phone calls. You can reach me at pastor@stpaulcapeann or call. We have been reaching out every day by telephone, checking in with people. This is a new way of life for us, but we are still church. If you would like to talk with me through Zoom or Facetime or Messenger, I am happy to arrange that.

Here is the link for the Zoom Bible Study which will be held each Wednesday at noon.

Topic: Zoom Bible Study!
Time: This is a recurring meeting Meet anytime

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us04web.zoom.us/j/783279902?pwd=dWtHNjNxejZyRnZnUVFaSjZHOW1FUT09

Meeting ID: 783 279 902
Password: 043375

One tap mobile
+13126266799,,783279902# US (Chicago)
+16465588656,,783279902# US (New York)

Dial by your location
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 720 707 2699 US (Denver)
        +1 253 215 8782 US
        +1 301 715 8592 US
Meeting ID: 783 279 902
Find your local number: https://us04web.zoom.us/u/fbwa3wAdaH


March 19th, 2020–SPRING!!!!

This is what is going out today in our church newsletter, St. Paul FYI. I wanted to share it here as well.

Dear Beloved Friends,

Today is the first day of Spring! I’m grateful for it. In the midst of all the overload of information, our complete change of life, our fears and worries about what the next weeks will bring, nevertheless, Spring has arrived. The first flowers are beginning to come up, daffodils and myrtle in our yard. What are you noticing in nature this week? What calls your attention? The ocean? The sky? New growth? Paying attention to the beauty of creation rests my heart and cheers my soul. We live in the midst of beauty that nourishes our spirits.

First myrtle blossom at home.

Many of us have rearranged our lives these last couple of weeks.  Churches all over our Synod of been working to understanding what it means to be church in this time. We’re wondering what we need to be doing, who do we need to reach, how shall we stay connected. Here at St. Paul, we are holding on-line services and Sunday School. I want to thank Robin Carlo for all she is doing to help our Sunday School families to continue to participate in at-home spiritual formation. I want to thank Carl Johnson, Howard Blazzard, Joel Maxwell and Anne Wheeler for helping us to offer worship and prayer services in a new way. We also continue to minister to people in need in our communities as best we can.

Please do not hesitate to call or email me. Please feel free to contact the church office as well, through email or telephone. Anne W. is working from home, but can receive emails and retrieve phone messages. We are connected still, in spirit and and in love. I hope you know that I am thinking of you, praying for you, and walking with you.  We are a sturdy, faithful, beloved community in Christ. In the Resurrection, Our Lord Jesus has carried us already from death to life, and he will continue to do so.

Love, Pastor Anne

ST. PAUL COVID-19 UPDATE

Dear Friends,

As you know from yesterday’s St. Paul FYI email communication, we have been considering the best ways we can be church in this time of pandemic. We wanted to respond thoughtfully and prayerfully, in a spirit of peace, not of panic. Early this week, after the Council meeting, we formed a small preparedness team to advise the Council.

Today, we decided to postpone physical gatherings including Sunday worship for at least the next two Sundays, March 15th and March 22nd. We made this decision after much deliberation and consultation.  We all feel the sadness of this decision, but we feel it is the wisest and most compassionate decision based on what we know.  We plan to experiment with various forms of virtual church. This Sunday, we will broadcast a Facebook Live service at 10:00 a.m. Theodore Stoddard and I will be testing this out. We look forward to seeing what will happen.

We know that not all of you are on Facebook, so we will be trying other online platforms next week. We will keep you posted.  Virtual church has been around for several years, and I’m excited that we are going to try this way of being church, even as I mourn the loss of our physical gatherings for worship.

I will be updating you on other activities during these two weeks; for now, all our regular gatherings are postponed.  We ask for your patience and your help, should you have ideas as we go forward. I will work on virtual bible study and weekly devotions. Robin Carlo is working on virtual Sunday School, and expects to broadcast Facebook Live Sunday School at 9:15 a.m. this Sunday, March 15th.

The Council and I ask that you please keep in touch with each other, and with those who might be in need. We hope to create a phone tree, and you all know that you can call or write me. I will be checking in with you as much as possible by phone or email.

Lent offers us a time to embrace simplicity. This year, that simplicity is imposed upon us by events and circumstances out of our control. We can, however, choose our response. One of my friends wrote that compassion is our seat-belt in troubled times. I agree. In all that we are doing in these days of social distancing, my prayer is we remain interconnected as much as possible. May we remember those who may need assistance. May we know God’s presence in the midst of us.

In Christ,

Pastor Anne Deneen

Sabbath-Keeping and Lent

Dawn on Good Harbor Beach

As many of you already know, we chose to use a devotional supplement this Lent called Wendell Berry and the Sabbath Poetry of Lent published by the Salt Project. On the First Sunday of Lent, we held an intergenerational Beloved Community event, where we talked together about keeping the Sabbath, Lent intentions, and our needs as a community and as individuals. Children and adults were present, and you can see some of the responses on our Facebook page. It was a fruitful and provocative morning. Here’s what broke my heart: some of the children, as young as kindergartners, spoke of the anxiety and stress they feel. The thought of a day where they didn’t have to do anything was a joy to them. They said they’d like to do things like spend time with their families, walk their dog, read a book, stay in bed late. And they recognized their level of stress would decrease were they to have a day of peace. I hope that having some time to talk about Sabbath helped them think about how they might rest during this Lent.

During the morning, I presented some thoughts on Sabbath-Keeping and Lent. Below are my notes for the presentation in case you are interested.

Lent and the Sabbath

Lent is a kind of Sabbath: its disciplines are prayer, fasting, or making room for God, and works of mercy—doing good for the world. This Lent, we are thinking about Sabbath, and the ways we ourselves might keep it. I have come to learn that Sabbath is about trust, about surrender to rest, surrender to God, a releasing of the grip, all about that famous slogan people love to say: letting go and letting God. That’s the invitation of the Sabbath. That’s the invitation of Lent—as we travel along the way, to open, to release, to forgive, to widen our hearts.

On Ash Wednesday, Isaiah links Sabbath-keeping to justice, that our Sabbath rest, our capacity to deeply rest and enter that peace, that shalom, does have to do with what happens to our neighbors, our animals, our lands, all of our ways of making a living. Part of remembering Sabbath is doing just what Isaiah suggests on the days we work and play: we offer food to the hungry, we offer ourselves in service to neighbor; we “remove the yoke;” that is, we make attempts, however small they are, to undo injustice, to undo prejudice. And Sabbath helps us learn it. My rest, my peace, is linked to yours, and to people all over the world. Sabbath teaches our interdependence, our connections with God and each other.

Remember the Sabbath and keep it holy. Sometimes we simply need rest to do what we are called to do, to work for justice and mercy with loving, peaceful hearts.

Here is the commandment from Exodus 20: 8-11 8” Remember the sabbath day, and keep it holy. Six days you shall labor and do all your work. 10 But the seventh day is a sabbath to the Lord your God; you shall not do any work—you, your son or your daughter, your male or female slave, your livestock, or the alien resident in your towns. 11 For in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is in them, but rested the seventh day; therefore the Lord blessed the sabbath day and consecrated it.” (NRSV).

This description of Sabbath is inclusive. As you can see from reading it, Sabbath keeping guarantees rest for everyone, every resident and stranger, even livestock. This sacred world itself, our dear blue-green planet, would have a day of rest, if we would try to keep this commandment. Keeping the Sabbath disrupts the week, interrupts and resists oppressive work arrangements. We make room in the week to remember and honor the dignity of life and rest. Perhaps Sabbath-keeping is a way of remembering every person is made in the image of God. That memory itself is a disruption to inhumane social systems.  

Sabbath-keeping is built into biblical faith. This idea that time itself is a holy gift comes out of the creation story: that moment when God blesses each day, and on the seventh day, God calls it holy. God makes time itself holy, time itself a gift. The days of existence become precious, unrepeatable holy minutes, never again to be had opportunities for heaven and earth to meet in our lives.

There’s a quality to the Sabbath that we haven’t made ourselves—this is from Abraham Heschel who has a beautiful book called The Sabbath:

The Sabbath, he writes: “is like a palace in time with a kingdom for all. It is not a date but an atmosphere. It is not a different state of consciousness, but a different climate; it is as if the appearance of all things is somehow changed. The primary awareness is one of our being within the Sabbath rather than of the Sabbath being within us. We may not know whether our understanding of the day is correct, or whether our sentiments are noble, but the air of the day surrounds us like spring which spreads over the land without our aid or notice.”

As a pastor, I do remember the Sabbath, of course, but I’m not usually resting that day. And I can write about not keeping the Sabbath from my own experience of not keeping it, for which I ask God’s forgiveness. I know from listening to their stories that rest is in short supply for most working people and their families. It seems impossible to find time for restorative quiet, or even the brief vacancy of not thinking about what has to be done next. Some people are juggling more than one job, caretaking their children, and their aging parents. If a crisis hits, like an unforeseen illness, or accident, or loss of income, or some other larger crisis, the pressure is even higher.  During these weeks of concern and anxiety about the spread of the coronavirus, we can see how suddenly the orders of lives are disrupted. Our stress increases. To broaden the issue, rest is nearly impossible for those who are homeless, or hungry, refugees fleeing violence, or people suffering other forms of oppression. I can think of so many ways our simple human needs for rest, for peace, for quiet, even the need for sleep, are denied. Yet, the body needs rest, the spirit needs rest. What a different world it would be, were we able to simply put down our work for a day. All the great practitioners of mercy and justice needed rest. Jesus made a point of going apart for rest, to the mountains, or walking by the sea.

Perhaps the best part of remembering the Sabbath is the time to remember who we are, even if it’s a brief recollection: here is holy time to reorient, to recommit, to resist indignity, to honor life, to celebrate the beauty of existence, to worship the God of our understanding, to wonder, to receive the gifts of life. Sabbath is grace-filled. Lent is a time like this. Lent asks us to put down some of our preoccupations, just the Sabbath does. Peace simply arises when we stop our incessant doing. It just simply arises. Holy rest is there, within creation; it’s built into it. Tides rise and fall. Storms come and go. The day ends, night begins, the day returns. We did nothing to make that happen. We did nothing to make the sun shine, or the snow to fall. We did nothing to create the mourning dove huddled in the snowdrift or the heavy branches of the cedars, we did nothing to make the cry of a wolf at night, or the song of a whale, or the slow gaze of a turtle. We did not create ourselves. We did nothing to make this day, or any day. It is there, presented, offered, and vulnerable. Perhaps if we do nothing else this Lent, we could practice keeping the commandment to remember the Sabbath and keep it holy. When you do, may you find rest and holy within that day. May you find rest and refreshment within this Lent.

The Rev. Val Roberts-Toler’s Sermon of January 19th, 2020

Several of you have asked for the Rev. Val Roberts-Toler’s sermon of January 19th. We welcome Val to the pulpit. She and her husband The Rev. Printice Roberts-Toler are both retired United Methodist pastors, and have been attending St. Paul for the last few months. In this sermon, Val preaches about discipleship and her experience in coming to this congregation.

It is the Patriot’s fault. Every Sunday afternoon when they are playing, my husband the avid fan, is sure to be watching. I am not a fan of football. But we have a good deal. He watches and I go wandering. I go off to the beach or to a movie or to hear a speaker or to listen to live music.

That is how I ended up at Jalapeno’s, a Mexican restaurant in Gloucester that Sunday afternoon listening to Celtic music. And that is when Michael O’Leary and I got to talking.  It was Michael who suggested this church and this pastor. And that is how we ended up here. We came that next Sunday and we never left!

“What are you looking for?”(vs38) Asks Jesus, of those first two disciples who had first followed John and who then began to follow Him.

I believe that what the disciples were searching for, what we were looking for and what so many people all around us are searching for are the same.  Augustine captured this best when he prayed, “You have made us for yourself, Oh God, and our hearts are restless until we rest in Thee.”

Our search for a church was a search for the Beloved Community. Pastor Anne referred to that in your wonderful directory, as “a community of repentance, a community of remembrance, a community of hope, love, revelation, and justice.” We are not meant to journey after Jesus alone, we need each other.

Paul’s letter to the church at Corinth celebrates the faithfulness of that particular community. It reminds us that we are called into fellowship.  “God is faithful; by Him you were called into the fellowship of His Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.” (vs9) Paul says that this is a community filled with grace. It is a community that is not lacking in spiritual gifts.

And so on this Sunday before your annual meeting. I want to offer my own epistle by celebrating this community, your spiritual gifts, and the grace which we are experiencing here. And in the end, I also want to issue a challenge.

I know that you treasure this church, but sometimes it is a good thing to hear the perspective of an outsider.  I want you to know how amazing this church is. And while I am brand new to this church, I do know a lot about churches having served seven of them. And so “to the church of God called St. Paul’s grace to you and peace…”

So often I can sense the connection Pastor Anne has with all of you.  To a person people have shared how much you love and appreciate your pastor. The fact that Pastor Anne has been here for so many years is really such a strength.

You also love one another. And that is a beautiful thing and it is pleasing to God! (not always true)

The liturgy and the music and the sacrament are all powerful for us. I often keep my bulletin so I can read over the prayers.  I find myself humming the hymns. (Wade in the Water) (Postlude PTTLTA)Each word preached or prayed, sung or spoken speaks to both of us.

You had the vision to grow this church through investing in family ministries, and you stepped out in faith and then God sent Robin along.  She is brilliant. Every church needs a Robin.

 You are a church that welcomes people to get involved and to share their gifts. Rejoice that Abbey’s ministry has been nurtured here. Every person whose life she will touch, and there will be many, are the fruit of your ministry.

Your concern about caring for the environment is especially important as, we live surrounded by the stunning ocean, which so needs our care. You are reaching out to the hungry and to the homeless after the manner of Jesus.

Your stewardship is fantastic. Having a fully pledged budget is rare and it says so much about how truly invested each of you are in this ministry. Too many churches are living off of endowment funds.

Just as Isaiah talks about Israel as a light for the nations. So I believe that this ministry is a light for the Northshore and beyond. You have much to celebrate as you look back at 2019 but as you look ahead to 2020 and beyond, I want to challenge all of us.

As the people of God we are called to be a people on the move. In a bad news world we simply cannot keep the Good News of the Gospel to ourselves.  And especially on this weekend when we celebrate the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr’s legacy we are reminded that we always need to be asking the question—who is missing? Who is missing from the table?

Neither John nor Andrew could keep the news of Jesus to themselves. They just couldn’t. I don’t think that Michael O’Leary considers himself an Andrew, who went to bring Peter to Jesus but that is who Michael was to me that afternoon. Michael spoke up—will we speak up?

With the Psalmist may we faithfully be able to say, “God has put a new song in our hearts… Many will see and fear and put their trust in the Lord…We have not hidden your saving help within our hearts, we have spoken of your faithfulness and your salvation; we have not concealed your steadfast love and faithfulness from the great congregation.”

So who is it in your circle, that you work with, live near, go to school with who is restless and filled with longing to meet the living God and longing to belong to a caring community? Who might be sitting next to YOU at Jalapeno’s?!

Having served UMC churches for decades, you might wonder why we drive right by one to come here.  When recent legislation has limited the full participation of the LGBQT community, we could no longer support our denomination. It was a deal breaker for us, as it is for so many, especially for our young people.

 I so appreciate your mission statement, from the church council, “we are a community that strives to follow the message of Jesus’ unconditional inclusion…we welcome all persons, all ages, all ages, genders, sexual orientations ,races and faiths..

 Yet because the LGBQT community has been wounded by the church at large, I believe we have to be very intentional about advertising our welcome. As a pastor friend once said, “We have to let them know that the electricity in the fence has been turned off!” That this is a safe place. How might we do this?

I am working with Young Life.  (A+R) Of the six churches we visited there very few young people. So YL goes to where the kids are. I believe that young people are literally dying to know Jesus, the Resurrection and the Life. I believe they need us, the beloved community. In my last church, about this size, there were 7 kids who were hospitalized for depression, anxiety and suicidal thoughts.

Through YL I have met several immigrants. One young man grew up in a refugee camp in Uganda. He and I have become friends. Recently I was helping find him a used car—his first car.

 It was eye opening to me to see how difficult it is to navigate the system of buying, insuring, and registering a car. This process was totally foreign to him. And again on this MLK weekend, I have to say, I was painfully aware of white privilege… I have to wonder if he would have been treated as well if I had not been present. Gloucester is filled with refugees who are far from home and who need the Lord, “who is our dwelling place for all generations” and who long for community

Will we dare to say to them, “Come and See.”

The temptation is to guard what we have to want to protect it. None of us likes change. And I confess that, already, I find myself thinking what if we grow too much, will we need two services. Will there be enough parking? Not to make you nervous, but…church growth experts tell us that once a church is 80% full—we have to start looking ahead…

 Let me close first by thanking Pastor Anne for trusting me with this pulpit, and then you for this ministry and for your faithful service to God that has created this place.

And finally with the words of our next hymn. “I come with joy to meet the Lord, the love that made us, makes us one, and strangers now our friends, and strangers now are friends…Together met, together bound by all that God has done we’ll go with joy to give the world, the love that makes us one.”

Amen

The Rev. Val Roberts-Toler

Annual Meeting, Annual Report and Constitution

Our Annual Meeting is this Sunday, January 26th immediately following the service. If you wish to see the Annual Report, you can access find it here. If you wish to see the St. Paul Constitution, By-Laws and Continuing Resolutions which we plan to ratify on Sunday, you may see it here.

Annual Meeting: Sunday January 26th, 2020 Immediately after Worship with Lunch to Follow.

Every year in January, our congregation prepares an Annual Report for our Annual Meeting. This year we are publishing a little differently. Instead of producing 80 hard copies of the Annual Report, we have decided to be more conscious of our paper use. Last year, we had so many paper copies left over, we decided it would be an irresponsible use of paper to make so many this year. Instead of paper copies, we will be sending electronic copies by email. If congregants do not have email or computers and need a paper copy, we will make a limited number of them. Please let us know by email or telephone that you need a reserved copy.

This is also the case with our Constitution. As you know, we are ratifying the updated Constitution for which we voted last year. If you need a hard copy of the updated Constitution and By-Laws, please let us know, and we will copy one for you. Otherwise, we can send you an electronic version.

This year’s Report presents an overview of our congregational life. You will be delighted when you read it to see all that has happened this year. As always, I’m left with awe and gratitude for all of you. It is a blessing and privilege to serve as your pastor.